Meet My Friend LAURA VOSIKA, Author of the Time-Travel Historical Fiction Series: Blue Bells Chronicles

When I first read The Blue Bells of Scotland, I was immediately caught up in Laura Vosika’s fascinating story of two men, identical in looks, who suddenly switch places.  Shawn Kleiner, a famous and spoiled musician, finds himself transported seven hundred years in the past. At the same time, Niall Campbell travels seven hundred years forward, to our present.

Laura develops her characters beautifully through all the books, including those surrounding the men and with whom they have relationships. I’ve read them all, and eagerly await the release of The Battle is O’er. In fact, I may have been first in line to pre-order it and cannot wait to read it.

Laura is as interesting as her books, and it’s my pleasure to have her with us. Thank you for joining us, Laura!

Tell us about your background. How did you get your start in writing, and how long have you been writing?

I grew up in the military—a great way to live if you look at the positives. You meet lots of people from lots of backgrounds. You learn about the world and other people and that there are a wealth of ideas and ways to live well.

On the down side, it’s easy to end up a bit rootless when you’re always the new kid in school. But there are always books. Whether I would have been a great reader anyway, I’ll never know, but there was certainly plenty of time to read in the summers we had just moved, before school started.

I started writing at a very young age. I tried a few poems when I was eight (and it’s probably just as well they’re long lost!) At nine, I was writing short stories and ‘binding’ them to put on the classroom’s book shelf. At ten, I was starting my first novel. 

When was your first book published, and how many have you published since?

Blue Bells of Scotland was published on September 11, 2009—wow how time flies! Then came the second book, The Minstrel Boy, then The Water is Wide, and Westering Home, all in The Blue Bells ChroniclesThe Battle is O’er is my fifth novel.  I’ve also published Go Home and Practice, a musician’s record book, and Food and Feast in the World of the Blue Bells Chronicles: a gastronomic historic poetic musical romp in thyme, a collection of scenes from the novels that features over 200 recipes, the majority from medieval sources, along with history, stories, poems, and songs associated with the scenes.

How much does your background influence your writing?

A great deal, I’d say. I spent my earliest years in Germany, visiting castles and medieval towns, driving in the Alps, going down into the salt mines, camping in England where we once pitched our tent (with the sexton’s permission) just outside an ancient cemetery. When we lived on the east coast, we went to many historic sites. History has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember, including medieval history. 

Then there’s the music. The Blue Bells Chronicles centers on Shawn Klein, a famous classical trombonist. This is my background. I majored in music, on trombone, and for a time freelanced with various types of orchestras and chamber playing — so Shawn’s world is one with which I’m well-acquainted. Like Niall, the medieval Highlander, I also play harp. 

What inspires you to continue writing?

The letters I get from readers, telling me how they love the books and are eagerly awaiting the next one, are very uplifting and keep me going faster than I might otherwise. But to me, writing is something I can’t NOT do. I’ve been writing stories almost since I was able to write. Niall and Shawn are, in a sense, very real, and I can’t NOT write their story. 

I can attest to that, being one of those readers eagerly awaiting the next one! Aside from your fans, what is the best thing about being a writer?

Apart from the thrill of bringing worlds and people to life–the connections I’ve made with other people; the people I’ve met as a result of writing. I’ve met people literally all over the world whom I would never have known otherwise; and some I’ve become friends with, whether that be other writers or readers. 

What is the worst thing?

It’s not exactly a steady stream of income and there are no benefits; like healthcare and paid vacation.

What is your single best piece of advice for aspiring authors?

Find a writer’s group to join. Get feedback on your writing.

Why do the events of the past matter to us today? Why do we keep reading about the past?

We learn from the past. Every age has its wisdom and every age has its follies. A recurring theme throughout The Blue Bells Chronicles is the contrast of eras. Niall thinks very little of Shawn or his time–and Shawn has equally negative views of both Niall and his century. But as the story progresses, Niall learns there are some good things to be had in the modern time, while Shawn comes to realize that his society also has its flaws, and that maybe, while we’ve improved many things, we’ve also thrown out some good ideas and some wisdom. 

 When we read about history, we’re learning–both from what an age did right, and from their mistakes. Apart from that, we’re learning some great stories!

Laura, it has been a pleasure chatting with you. I understand you have an event coming up. Would you share a little about that?

I’ll be doing an ‘author takeover’ on Facebook, March 24 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. I’d love to have you and your readers join me. Here’s the link: Author Takeover with Laura Vosika

Thank you so much! And thank you for this excerpt from your new book The Battle is O’er. Click here to pre-order the book, and enjoy the excerpt. More of Laura’s links follow.


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“You know these tunnels?” the chief asked.

“I know them well,” Shawn said tersely.

You’re in your time. That had been Amy, as he led her, too, seven hundred years later, just months ago in July, through these same passages. A chill shot through him, wondering if Niall might be down here. He had seen just a glimpse of him, as he burst into the chapel, just a glimpse of his best friend, his brother, knife raised, looking at Simon, as he faded away. Yes, he, too, would be in these passages, searching for Simon in his own time.

“How do you know them?” Clive asked. His light played over the dirt floor.

“Watch carefully,” Shawn returned. “There’s a side passage opening up. He could be hiding there.”

“How do you know them?” Clive asked again.

“I told you,” Shawn said irritably. “I spent a good part of two years here.”

“You were only gone a year.”

In the close passage, Shawn spun. “Do you not get it? There’s a medieval madman down here—maybe—who will kill you. He’ll have his knife under your ribs and through your heart in the blink of an eye, if you’re not paying attention! Could we maybe have our coffee klatch later?”

In the shadowed light of the labyrinth, Clive’s face remained passive, his eyes dark. He nodded, and spoke to the chief. “Guard the exit. I’ll go with Kleiner.” Before his boss could object, he pushed ahead in the cramped tunnel, saying over his shoulder, “You’re needed at the precinct.”






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#15. And Then Along Came Twiggy (No Comparison – Part One)

The Visible Platform

Eleanor Roosevelt said, “You wouldn’t worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do.” People are so wrapped up in themselves that they hardly notice your flaws. But if you are so wrapped up in yourself that your flaws are all you can see, then it’s time to start unwrapping.

It’s possible that you have become your own worst enemy, your most ungracious critic. The illusion of perfection may have infiltrated your self-image, but the good news is that feelings of inferiority can be reversed.

Mark Twain said, “Comparison is the death of joy.” We’re going to look at some of those comparisons which zap our joy and block the path to true contentment.

Comparing ourselves to others begins at a very early age. Little babies carefully observe their parents behaviors and start imitating them as early as six months old. Being the…

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Solitary Pursuits

Meet my friend, Ruth Douthitt. She’s the author of some wonderful middle-grade/teen fantasy books, which I’ve read, and others that are in my To-Be-Read file. In my estimation, she’s a super woman, a runner, an author, an artist, a wife and mother, and a fellow military Brat.

Ruth shares some unique insights of characteristics shared by both running and writing. Enjoy!

      by R.A. Douthitt

Yes, I know you’ve read about how writing is similar to running. I’ve read those posts, too. But I wanted to blog a little about how writing and running are similar because I do both…a lot! and I want to share some of the lessons I’ve learned.

All By Myself

Remember that song from the 70s? It’s so tragically sad, but true. Nobody wants to be alone.

One of the many similarities between writing and running is that both can be lonely.

I run and train for marathons and even a few ultra marathons. I have also written 8 books. Writing and running can be lonely, but at least with running, you can ask friends to join you!

But with writing, it’s up to you and you alone to do the work. For me, that’s why I set goals for myself. Setting goals keeps me on task. I let others know about my goals so I am held accountable. It helps!

“Attend a conference or join a critique group!” some writers have told me. They explain how these two actions will help end the loneliness. But, as with running, you’ll still have many moments alone.

During the last ultra marathon race I participated in, I was hit with this realization. During the day, I ran alongside many runners, but once the sun goes down at mile 31, many runners leave or head to their tents to sleep. That’s when the race is at its toughest. The trail is dark, the air grows colder, and all you hear is the sound of your shoes on the gravel trail. At that point in the race, you’ll want to quit. Running is much easier with the cheers from spectators and other runners around you!

Yet, you have to keep going, putting one step in front of the other. Writing is the same way. Conferences are terrific! I love meeting other writers and attending workshops so I can learn more about the craft. Critique groups are so helpful. But once I return home from a conference or critique, however, I have to sit at my desk with the computer and work…ALONE.

Family and friends encourage you to write, as those race spectators encourage you to run and that does help. They patiently listen to you summarize your plot, describe your characters, and detail the setting, God bless them. Without them, you’d probably give up.

A race is a race, and there’s nothing like the feeling of seeing the Finish Line as you near the end. Same with writing. It is a race to the finish! We may have pending deadlines created by publishers or ourselves. These finish lines motivate us to stay the course.

Yes, as with running, writing can be lonely. Like training for a marathon, writing requires discipline and endurance.

Finally, as with racing, there is a prize at the end. A reward is needed to remind you why you set out to complete a grueling race or why you are determined to write a book. Make sure you have a reward set aside for yourself, whether it’s a release party, a dinner with family, or a vacation/retreat. Do something good for yourself, you deserve it!

After I complete a book, I throw a party. After an ultra marathon, my family and I usually go out to dinner so I have replace all those calories I burned off. All the pain and loneliness of training is worth it as I sit and celebrate with my family.

These are the lessons I have learned. I keep setting writing goals (I plan on publishing 3 books this year…) along with running goals (triathlons and a half marathon later this year) so that I am motivated to continue.

I stay motivated to endure to the end so I can cross that finish line with my head held high.

Keep running! Keep writing…

 Click on the book covers to get to her Amazon Author Page:

It’s HERE! The Third Book In The TETRASPHERE Series!

When Jewel Adams and her friends are needed in South America, they discover that something is terribly wrong. A malevolent enemy is zeroing in on Jewel, putting her in danger of losing herself, the people she loves, and her world. How can they stop him?

Watch the Voice of Viracocha trailer, and comment what you think of it below.

The book is available in several formats. You can find it and the others in the series on my website,, or go directly to my publishers, Foundations Books.

I’d love to hear from you!

Nothing Makes An Author Happier Than A GREAT Review!

I subscribe to several sites where I find important information and help as an author, including A Writer’s Path and The Book Review Directory. What a pleasant surprise to see my book, TERRA’S CALL, featured today!

Reviews mean several things to an author. We know someone has read our book, and we’re happy that they liked it, or we can learn from their critique if they don’t. Reviews can help move a book up the charts, and good reviews can help readers decide to purchase and read it.

It means a lot to me, and to other authors, when someone takes the time to write a review. Thank you, Kristine Kohut, for this one!


Author’s name: P.T.L. Perrin

Book Title: Terra’s Call: Book 1 of the TetraSphere Series

Genre of the book: Teen, Young Adult, Science Fiction, Adventure





Triton’s Call is LIVE, and we’re celebrating with another giveaway!

The last Kindle Fire giveaway was such a success, I decided to do it again. You have thirty days from today, October 30, 2017, to enter to win a Kindle Fire 7 tablet with Alexa.

Click here to enter today! Don’t wait! You can earn more entries once you’ve registered on the website, and, if you aren’t on my newsletter list, you will be once you enter!

If you want to order Triton’s Call, click here to visit my website. Watch the trailer, order the book, and check out my other books!

Nanowrimo starts tomorrow. That’s National Novel Writing Month, where those of us who sign up for the challenge will write 50,000 words in 30 days.

I honestly did not think it could be done, and signed up the first time just to see how far I’d get. I wrote the first draft of Terra’s Call that time — 50,000 words of it.

Triton’s Call was born during Camp Nanowrimo in April, 2016. Again, the challenge was the same, and the first 50,000 words of the first draft happened.

I couldn’t stop there, so that November, I wrote the first draft of Voice of Viracocha, which should be released before Christmas! How could I possibly stop now?  I have one more book to write to complete the TETRASPHERE series, and this is the month I hope to get the first draft done.

I’ll ask you to pray for me, as I’ll be praying for everyone who’s taking this challenge. It is not easy, especially during the Holiday season. I thank God for my Daughter-In-Law who will be doing Thanksgiving this year, and for her other Mother-In-Law and everyone else who is bringing goodies for the celebration. We have so much to be thankful for.

Now, go enter for your chance to win that Kindle, and check out my other books!